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collection. (applause) >> thank you. during his undergraduate years at ucla he participated in civil rights and anti-war protests and many of his subsequent writings reflects his experiences by stressing the importance of grassroots political activity in the african-american freedom struggle. his first book, end struggle snick and the black awakening of the 1960s remains a definitive history of student nonviolent coordinating committee, one of the most dynamic and innovative civil rights organizations of our time. he served as senior advisor for a 14-part award winning public television series on civil rights entitled "eyes on the prize." i know we all remember that. (applause) >> his recent, his recent publication, the book, martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr., a memoir about his transition from being a teenage participant in the march on washington to becoming a historian and an educator and, of course, if you sign up for a membership you can get that book today. it's here. in 1985 he was invited by coretta scott king to direct a long-term project to edit
of sister rosa parks and commemorating the modern civil rights leader for her courageous and declaring -- for her courageousness and declaring february 4th rosa parks day in san francisco. (applause) >> i thought you might like that. i'm done. thank you. [laughter] >> thank you. supervisor. and now there are a couple other people, sheriff mirkarimi has joined us. [speaker not understood] is in the room with us as well. reverend amos brown is with us. welcome. (applause) >> now supervisor breed will bring us brief remarks. >> hi, everybody. (applause) >> so happy to see all your smiling faces in the audience. happy black history month. i bring you greetings on behalf of district 5 in our great city. thank you, mr. mayor, for opening up city hall to my colleague, supervisor cohen, and my distinguished colleagues sitting here in the front row on the board of supervisors. it's truly an honor to stand before you on such a great month. recent -- yesterday congresswoman barbara lee talked about dr. martin luther king and his dream and some of the issues that we were dealing with over 40 years
became involved in civil rights movement to protect housing discrimination after a local real estate office refused to work with him because he was black. then there were a very significant first. first african american elected to san francisco in the california state assembly. the first african american speaker of the california state assembly. and as we all know the first african mayor of san francisco [ applause ] >> first, the first, the first. and a speaker of the assembly he would also become the first and the only politicians to hold that position for 15 years. longer than any other individual so much so that a new paradigm was created with prop 140 which instituted term limits. had that not happened and all likelihood, willie brown might still be speaker had he so desired the. [ [ applause ] >> it's worth noting that willie became speaker of the state assembly after the coalition of republican and democrats. 28 republicans, 23 democrats. some say this goes back to a period of more consilt tree and less contentious part of american policies. i would a tend that it's his way to
. >> this is a big historic moment. >> this is a basic civil rights issue. >> our colleague, our teachers, our soldiers, our friends. >> can you imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying flat-out, i am for gay marriage? >> i could. >> immigration makes us stronger. it is part of what makes this such a dynamic country. >> no immigration reform is going to happen unless republicans in the house sign on to it. >> the time's come for comprehensive, sensible immigration reform. >> we are going to have a vote on assault weapons and we're going to have a vote on background checks. >> he can't spend enough of his $27 billion to try to impose his will on the american public. >> 90% of the public want something. >> i mean, it's insane the stuff he says. >> this isn't about wayne lapierre. it's about the public wanting to be safe on their streets. ♪ you don't need a weatherman to know it's where the wind blows ♪ >> it's a busy and wintery monday on the east coast. congress is on spring break as lawmakers return to their districts where they're likely to face constituents r
to doma. this was john lewis, 1996, talking about the civil right, the right of a human being to marry another. their there has been a long struggle for civil right for gay and lesbian people. and there were people early on who recognized this was a fundamental civil rights issue. the reason people are coming to that view is because of people coming out in their countries and whether it is john roberts or other people in the country realizing that they are brothers and sisters and cousins of people who are gay and lesbian. and it is inevitable. watching ralph reed with the most ridiculous argument i've ever heard of the many ridiculous arguments against gay marriage. he's arguing the only reason people get player sid to have children. people get married because they want to be in a loving, committed relationship with each other. there is no reason that fundamental right should be denied. >> to steve's point, ralph reed was not discussing the lawful he is talking about religion and emotional reaction to marriage and the sanctity of it. i want to play this. he was on "meet the press." >>
amos brown to present the plaque to mayor brown's unwavering commitment to civil rights. [ applause ] >> thank you richard brown. it's good to see you and thank you dr. parkel. that's all i got. i could listen to him talk all day. that was fantastic. >> christina, would you like to come up again? >> thank you. we have a few special thank yous that we want to wrap the ceremony up with. if vernal, elsie and deanna if you can please come up. we would really appreciate it. and so behalf on the mayor's office we would like to say thank you deeply for your contribution for making these services such a success. >> thank you. >> they are beautiful. >> for you. we have certificates of honor on behalf of the mayor's services. we are good at making certificates of honor. >> thank you. >> okay. and thank you to everybody for your contribution, your time and commitment to showing up today. the sponsors, we appreciate your support. now that concludes our ceremony. please enjoy the reception. thank you. (music) >> herb theatre,open rehearsal. listen to the rehearsal. i think it is fun for them, t
already had a conservative back lash building against the court from griswold and from civil rights and from miranda even. so it wasn't just this one decision that created that sort of back lash. and the other reason i don't think the parallel holds here is because people who believe, who are pro-life. who are staunchly pro-life, believe that abortion is tantamount to murder. no one thinks that gay marriage is like murder. so i don't think the emotions here run quite as high either. it is hard to imagine people really taking to the streets if doma were to be overturn at this time. >> yeah. and the other part of that is that while the emotions come from the grassroots, there has been a real shift among the political leadership in this country. when you look from president obama to president clinton to hillary clinton to rob portman to dick cheney, cleric mccaskill, jon huntsman. there are a tremendous number of federal officials, highly visible people in both parties. not only saying people should have this right, which is the moral position, but also saying something that i think cr
to marry, even from imprisoned felons. this is a basic civil rights issue. i don't think this is the kind of issue that will divide the court the way other issues divide the court. >> asia mills and jimmy la sylvia, director of go proud. good to see you both. >> thanks for having me. >> frank bruni said the final chapter of this story has in fact been written. the question isn't whether there will be a happy ending, the question is when. asia, is he right? >> absolutely. the tide has completely shifted on the as you announced earlier, the polling on marriage equality. we know this is not a matter of if, it is a matter of when. the states are moving this direction, it is a matter of time. >> even with the politicians, you see this move. jimmy, i was thinking about the fact that gay rights supporters weren't welcome at cpac, and you know who was, phyllis shaf lee, credited with turning back the equal rights amendment when in the '70s it seemed like a done deal. is it possible the celebrations are premature? >> i can tell you i agree, we have reached a tipping point on this. i was part of a
like this. it's a civil rights case, it seems like that would be the legacy that they want. but more curious things have happened in this court. let's go to doma for a second. >> the importance of doma says the federal government cannot deny federal benefits to people just because they are involved in a same-sex marriage. every single issue we are concerned about, whether it's lbgt worker's women boment baum care, all of those issues will be played out in the context of the immigration bill. in my point there is no point of bringing people out of the shadows only to make them second class citizens. it's all of us liberty and justice for all that has to happen. >> michael: yeah "politico" has an article out saying that there are these republican -- big doers in the republican party, that are going to give a lot more money if republicans start taking a stand that says -- that legalizes gay marriage in america. how big of factor is this, and do you believe it? >> i absolutely think there are gay republicans, some of them are my friends, that say it's tough for me.
of all colors. in 1968, dr. king told now is the time to come from the civil rights movement to the human rights movement. meaningful equality he said could not be achieved through civil rights alone. without basic human rights, the right to work, the right to shelter, the right to quality education, without basic human rights, he said, civil rights are an empty promise. so in honor of dr. king, and all those who labored to end the old jim crow, i hope we will commit ourselves to building a human rights movement to and mass incarceration. a movement for education, not incarceration. a movement for jobs, not jail. a movement to end all these forms of legal discrimination against people, discrimination that denies them basic human rights, to work, to shelter, and the food. now, what must we do to begin this movement? first i believe we've got to begin by telling the truth. the whole truth. we've got to be willing to admit out loud that we as a nation have managed to re-create a caste like system in this country. we've got to be willing to tell the truth in our schools, in our churches and o
in 2010, i appeared before the house judiciary subsidy committee on civil rights and civil liberties. i highlighted the numerous ways in which the internet has contributed to our economy and society as a whole. today, the impact is greater. in addition to the millions of jobs created, the internet economy accounts for only 5% of our gross domestic product according to a boston consulting group study. the internet has information an opportunity at the thinner -- fingertips of millions of users. we need updated laws to allow the ecosystem to continue to grow. on a daily basis, i see challenges created. 2010, google launched a transparency report which details the volume of requests for user data. in the last half of 2012, the number of requests google received from government agencies in criminal cases more than doubled compared to the same time in 2009. in 1986 whened electronics communications services were in their infancy. the statute no longer provides protection users reasonably expect. one example the committee may already be familiar with is from the rolls around compelled disclos
, an historic civil rights march. the reverend martin luther king jr. led 25,000 marchers to the st state capitol to protest the denial of voting rights to blacks. >>> happy birthday to aretha franklin. she turns 71. >>> here's a look at what's coming up on the "today" show. former penn state assistant coach jerry sandusky speaks out from behind bars for the first time since being convicted of child abuse. and usher talks about joining "the voice" ahead of tonight's season premiere. a shout-out to knbc and our friends at "today in l.a." last friday i was out there visiting, and they couldn't have been any more welcoming. great morning show and great morning team. thanks for the 70-degree weather. we need that. right, bill? keep it on this channel. i'm richard lui along with bill karins. thanks for watching "early today," just your first stop of the day on your nbc station. have a great monday. . . . >>> new this morning, the search for a swimmer who disappeared off the coast of half moon bay continues. we'll have the latest details next. >>> plus, people all over in the bay area getting r
is going on today in america would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement, which they played a leading role in pushing that forward, and ending the war in vietnam, and changing the wail we viewed citizen involvement in government, changing the way we think about our elected officials and the ability to create upstart movements. think all that was incredibly important. the beginning of the women's movement, all that great activism they produced, and that -- all of that, we're seeing that play out today. whether it's the election of barack barack obama or continued advancement of women in congress. there's a lot of work left undone, and i think that there's -- we now spend 3/4 of our entitlement money on people who are over the age of 30. used to be we spent 3/4 on people under the age of 30. it's not a question of generational warfare, but i think we need to have a conversation about how we're dividing our priorities. this is not a generation that expects to get those entitlements. my general has any belief the government is going to give them that money -- >> host
unconstitutiona. now, the supreme court has been asked to weigh n which is why these civil rights leaders gage yord to say smi ni decision will affect what happens here in california. >> we're seeing if it's unconstitutional to violate rights in michigan then why is it being done in california? >> in the first year after prop 209 passed, uc bolt lawsuit reported of the 271 students admitted only one was african american. tanya capner is an example of how things changed. >> so you face a situation where i was the only black student in the class after the ban for education program that. is just unacceptable. >> ward connereely is considered to be the man behind prop 209 and michigan's antiaffirmative action law. >> there is nothing more fundamental in my view than right to equal treatment bit government of every citizen in this country. >> bertrall ross teaches law at uc berkeley. >> two laws are similar to each other. i would say whatever the court says about prop 2 would have the same impact on prop 209. >> the supreme court will reaffirm the antiaffirmative action law in the fall. one footnot
would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement which they played a leading role in pushing it forward and ending the war in vietnam and changing the way that we view citizen involvement in government, changing the way that we think about our elected officials and the ability to create upstarts' movements all of that was incredibly important and the beginning of the women's movement, all that great activism they produce. whether it is the election of barack obama and continued advancement of women and congress. all of that is a direct result of their activism and that being said there is a lot of work left undone and i think that it's what we now spend. we spend our entitlement money on people who were over the age of 30 and used to be spending three-fourths of people under the age of 30 in terms of the amount of money and investment. it's not of generational warfare but i think that we need to have a conversation about how we are dividing our priorities. it's not a generation that expect to get those entitlements. not any believe the government is going to give t
we're going to win 5-4. i think this is a basic civil rights issue. i don't think this is a kind of issue that will divide the court the way some other issues divide the court. >> do you think it's possible the court makes a decision that doesn't resolve the right question? in other words, it doesn't resolve whether there's a right to marry? >> they could. there's a technical issue called standing that's raised here and the court could decide that the defendants don't have standing. that would result in allowing marriage equality in california because it would affirm the district court but it would not have any general applicability. >> we will be watching, mr. boies. thank you for being here. we're going to take a break. more from our roundtable as we we're going to take a break. more from our roundtable as we g [ lane ] are you growing old waiting for your wrinkle cream to work? neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair has the fastest retinol formula. to visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. neutrogena®. i work for 47 different companies. well, technically i work f
-- is keeping the draft some of the civil-rights movement and people were briefly joining martin mr. king was assassinated april of 68 and just after i graduated kennedy was assassinated that had a huge impact on me. instead as the good quality of law in london if you could write fast and giveback accurately you did well but in a harvard they would change the goalpost and that was interesting because it encouraged sinking but most of all but struck me which was so different from the ireland i have left was young people making a difference favor deciding we could make a change and use things and we are going to bring on our own perspective so i came back to ireland in 1968 to practice and teach lot and as mine has been to be said i was in view was something he recognized as harvard humility. that led me the following year to question why it was those who were traditionally elected to the six universities scenes with elderly male professors, why was that? my friend said if you do want to go forward we will campaign with you. i was elected to the senate at the age of 25 that means i was prac
of the last civil rights fight of their generation. and so you're going to be seeing them together. ted olson will be the one arguing the case. he's argued 60 times, suzanne, before the court. he's won 44 of those times. so it will be interesting to watch. >> that is dpoing to be a fascinating case. gloria, tell us a little about you have a special coming up as well. >> we do. >> you've spent a lot of time with these guys. >> it's really a story of how this case all got started. you'll recall, suzanne, when president obama was first elected in 2008, you covered that race, he was elected but then proposition 8 also passed in california. and that outlawed the right for same sex couples to marry, took it away from them in that state. and so you have a story that really starts in hollywood with rob rhiner of all people deciding, oh, my god, this can't occur and he and his friends recruiting ted olson and ted olson recruiting david on this case and making it through the california courts. and now to the supreme court. >> yeah. it's a fascinating story. gloria, thank you so much. appreciate it as a
a small bit at a time. >> civil rights. >> sure. certainly entitlements come to mind as well. the fact is, there is a period a few days after new town. where the idea of bringing back the ban on assault weapons would not have seen totally crazy. three or four months later, it's pretty clear that it's not going to happen now and the politics have not changed. time passes on, people move on, and we in the media cover other things and we're back to where we were prenewtown in a lot of ways. >> i think things have changed in this separates, it's safe to talk about guns, the president could mention guns in the state of the union. if everybody plays their cards correctly, we could see an expanded background checks, that would be a big thing. things have changed. >> it's incremental change, ruth. >> in two weeks we'll find out, we'll have the debate. ruth marcus, jonathan martin, thank you. up next, senator richard blumenthal on the future of the gun control legislation in the senate. you are watching "andrea mitchell reports." a febreze experiment. to prove febreze can keep this car fresh, we l
, you're framing it as a new class of people. >> it's a straight up civil rights case. >> we will see. many thanks. howard dean, we appreciate it. kelly ann conway, as always. up next, financial markets frowned on today's last minute cyprus bank bailout or deposit or bail-in. i say it's the right policy. does it spell more trouble for the euro zone? has a similar depositor crisis already happened here in the usa? >>> cyprus clinched a last-minute deal to resolve the country's financial crisis. cnbc's international correspondent michelle caruso-cabrera joins us from cyprus with the very latest. good evening, michelle. >> reporter: cyprus finally secured a bailout agreement, but it's a tough one. in exchange for the money, they agreed to downsize their two biggest banks, which means thousands of job losses and a big hit to the economy. in terms of bailouts, big firsts here. bond holders and uninsured depositors will face losses. that hasn't happened before. now investors are on notice. they're going to have to be a lot more careful. the european taxpayer isn't going to protect you like
's an astounding thing. never in the history of any civil rights movement have we come so far so fast. and, i would say, even if we achieve full marriage equality and all of the other equal status of citizenship in this country, there would be work to be done. let's remember that when we got the jim crow laws off of the books in the signatures for african-americans, it didn't mean the end of racism. and there will still be anti-gay feeling and sentiment in the country that will need to be worked on. but getting the laws in order, that is an important step forward. >> these are all signs of just about every sector of the economy, young people, older people? >> that's right. >> businesses, you know academics, whatever action recognizing that this is an issue whose time has come. right? >> that's right. we've got, i think it's 81% of young people. >> 81%. >> favors same-sex marriage. you know, it's interesting, too, if the republican party is interested in appealing to them young people do not want to be associated with any group, whether it be a religious group
, but marriage is not a religious her right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not cover right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage license. the government decides who gets married and who does not. in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving nurses virginia and blacks could not marry whites. they challenged that. the supreme court ruled 9-0. they have rolled 14 times about the fundamental rights of marriage. from a legal standpoint, there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint, there is no argument we feel confident. how broadly the supreme court will roll, that we do not know. >> go to c-span.org to see the rest of that discussion. live in half an hour we will have more on this issue. we will bring you a preview of the same-6 marriage cases coming before the high court tomorrow. legal experts -- legal experts will examine the case. that will be live here on c-span starting at 4:00 eastern. president obama today called on congress to begin
partnership regime and how foreign is equivalent to civil regimes elsewhere. it is in all the rights to domestic partners. it does not give the name. we said earlier that it cannot call themselves married. they can call themselves whenever they want. >> not if they apply for a passport. >> of their married the cannot do that. >> it is a federal crime. merit on a federaler o form? -- married on a federal form? sides agree both that the word marriage matters. the gays and lesbians as a degradation of some sort of recognition. those of us supporting to a traditional marriage see the word marriage draws on its that is tiedole to procreation and child rearing. we want men and women to understand that marriage is the ideal context in which to raise children, and in a sense to read the fine marriage in a way that eliminates the essential components. >> you have a bunch of people out there raising children right now cannot get married. if you think marriage is an important thing to happen your parents, if you think they would benefit from having unmarried parents. hawthorne and they have all
, but marriage is not a religious right. it's a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not have a right to marry someone except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage licenses. the government decidings who gets married and who doesn't. so in 1967, there was a supreme court case loving v. virginia and blacks continue marry whites. they challenged that and the supreme court ruled that 9-0. it was -- they have ruled now fourteen times about the fundamental right to marriage. from the legal substantiate -- standpoint there's no argument. you can a make a moral standpoint. from a legal substantiate -- standpoint. how broadly they will rule, that we don't know. >> the nation's highest court hears highest arguments challenging proposition 8 the constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. c-span and c-span radio will have live coverage beginning at 1:00 p.m. eastern. the reaction will play tomorrow night on c-span2. wednesday they hear arguments over the constitutionality of defense of marriage act. c-span and c-span radio will again have cove
case this is week. some call the push for same-sex marriage the civil rights issue of our time. they say the tide has turned and that it's time for a change. even karl rove thinks, yes, a republican candidate could embrace same-sex marriage. >> you can imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying flat out i'm for gay marriage? >> i could. >> and that's all karl rove would say. i'm joined by san francisco city town dennis herrera and austin nimox. good morning to you both. >> good morning. >> thank you for having us. >> austin, you heard what karl rove just said. are you on the wrong side of history? >> the only side of history with regard to marriage is the right one regarding the truth. and that really should be decided by the american people. americans have an inevitable and inalienable right to determine our own history and that's really a fundamental aspect of america. we have a massive political debate going on in this country about marriage. and the last thing we need is the supreme court to take this debate away from the american people, print a
. religious social service groups, civil rights groups to help the naacp, hispanic groups stepping forward. the hispanic caucus should take a much more forward issue. it needs to be replaced with assertive stand up for millions of american workers who are sweating it out on sweat labor. host: ralph nader, the calls are lining up. there, glad you are out think you're doing great work. even though as a republican i disagree with most of what you say, i think the free market has to increase the minimum wage. i particularly did not like the way the you say that the workers are doing twice the work that they were doing 30 years ago, your statistics, i do not know. just because you are doing twice the work, there is not a reason for that, it does not mean that they are running around more. i am not getting twice when i got paid when i started. i am 100% with the with c l's making too much money not being market-driven, i think that is where the energy should go. the other end will take care of itself, if you can figure out some way, and i hope you do, break down those crazy wages for the c o's.
is not a religious right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not have a right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage licenses. the government decides who gets married in two dozen. so in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving v. virginia, and blacks couldn't marry whites. they challenged that and the supreme court ruled that nine nothing. it was, they have ruled now 14 times about the fundamental right to marriage. from a legal standpoint there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint there is no argument. so we feel confident that i'm an outcome how broadly the supreme court will rule? that we don't know. >> tomorrow the nation's highest court hears oral arguments challenging california's proposition eight, a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage in that state. c-span and c-span radio will have live coverage beginning at 1 p.m. eastern. the arguments along with reaction will play again on c-span tomorrow night at 8 p.m. eastern. on wednesday th
of democracy and human rights and civil society, outside its own borders now for 200 years, just took on an impossible task in iraq. it just wasn't going to acceptst that. and i would say much more likely than that the american-- tank american influence will be incremental improvements in what is now a pretty dire situation, is that it's very likely to get worse, and lead to civil war, and it's not even clear that the most fundamental issue:00 is who governs in iraq, the majority shi'a, or the minority sunni, it's not even clear that that's, a settled issue, and if isn't a settled issue, and the sunnise prevail in syria and back their brothers across the borders of iraq and anbar, you may very well see a civil war, at least as brutal as we were witnessing in 2007 at the time time of the surge. >> rose: we will come back to manies thof point. >> or beloved late friend richard holbrooke once asked me. what did i think? what was my sounded bite about this war. i said we will did due course learn whether it was an open success or -- >> noble. >> he object toltd notification of noble failu
, you know. this right wing civil war and it's being waged quietly now because there's not a ton at stake in terms of elections but my gosh. ten years ago if you had thought a republican -- and republican leaders are basically urging politicians to embrace gay marriage, you know, the opposition which has been a cornerstone in the previous decade. suddenly embrace immigration reform and things like that. so you know, i don't think it is being done out of goodwill, honestly. i think is being done out of flip flopping and watching the polls. this is where the tension comes from, ralph reed talking about evangelicals will sit out. if they "embrace" gay marriage and the republican party and things like that. >> stephanie: same with immigration reform, right? they're basically saying we lost on that issue. >> sean hannity 24 hours after the election, he was like oh, forget it. ignore everything i've said for the last seven years. on the one hand, folks on the left can appreciate that they see it is a loser issue and if fox news throws in the towel on immigration hate, if they do, you k
continues, especially in the capital of damascus which is 18 battleground of the country's a civil war. >> the un is pulling half of its 100-member stepped out of that city as the violence increases. >> rebels have been firing mortars right into the heart of damascus. forces hit back, attacking rebel-held areas. so far, the government has held control of central damascus but the capital is now beginning to see the violence that has laid waste to other parts of syria. in the east of the country, the opposition had a setback. the founder of the free syrian army narrowly survived in suspected assassination attempt. he is being transferred to turkey for treatment. off the battlefield, the syrian opposition is being pulled apart by deep political provisions. the head of the coalition resigned on sunday, apparently frustrated by internal power struggles. the recently elected prime minister lacks unanimous backing from within the opposition ranks. these developments are being watched with concern abroad. >> on the one hand, we hope that the opposition pulls together again because any division
with the criminal case. he didn't take the stand. he asserted his right to remain silent. and now there is civil litigation pending, involving especially victim number two who you heard talked about in that clip. in a sense by testifying in this way, communicating through the media, he gets to participate, dump evidence into the court of public opinion which will have some effect on the civil proceedings, possibly even influence the appellate court though i doubt it. the bottom line is he gets to give his statement without subjecting himself to a deposition or testimony under oath in a court of law. what a creep. that guy has no guts. this is the coward's way, coward's way to seek justice. i don't think it's going to help at all. >> ann, let me ask you about this victim at the center, victim number two. the person who did the three hour interview with sandusky, it was a long interview, he claims that there were events in 2011 that shed new light on the case altogether. especially when it comes to victim two this was the boy in the shower with sandusky. so here's what ziegler claims victim two ha
right it seems to me to marry. if you want to say they have the 8 state solution where you say these are states that say you you can have civil marriage but can't have marriage per se. can't have a gay marriage. if that is the case why are you stigmatizing marriage in that situation. in the california case a matter of revoking something that has already been granted right to marriage. in both situations it seems you a constitutional right. a human being. an american citizen. you should have equal rights coast-to-coast. you ask the critical question what the rest of the panel is talking about this morning. the politics of it are that if the court rules everybody will be angry at the court and say that supreme court they are an elite and trying to tell us what to do justice kennedy who senator bayh is likely the swing vote. you can't have nine unelected people narrowly focused on the law making big decisions for the country. if that is the way they feel they will make a political decision and say it is up to the the states let them do what they want. con is not a matter of the ci
-sex marriage, nine more have strong civil union or partner ship laws. >> carol lynn tyler is traveling to washington, dc and will be sitting in court when the nation's highest court considers whether california's prop 8 wrongly denies gays and lesbians the right to marry. >>> the nationest highest court is taking on another big issue that cost taxpayers more than $3 billion a year. the a practice that leads to higher prescription prices. >>> also a silicon valley big wig is helping in the effort to keep the kings in sacramento. >> crash, crash, boom. >> neighbors say they've never seen or heard anything like it. a story behind a car's rough ride. >> leigh: i'm meteorologist leigh glaser. we have had a nice weekend, but we're going to see some changes weather weis this upcoming work week. >> a preliminary vote is expected on tuesday on a stadium deal intended to keep the kings in sacramento. sacramento mayor kevin johnson says the city reached a plame agreement for a new downtown arena with an investment group that hopes to keep the team from moving to seattle. johnson tweeted the group
has evolved is sort of a script that could have been written in hollywood. >> right. >> because in many ways it actually was written in hollywood. it was november 2008. barack obama had just won the white house. >> there's nothing civil about a man marrying another man! >> but proposition 8 passed, taking away the right for gays and lesbians to marry in california. >> california has made it very clear. >> we're sitting there, you know, kind of licking the wounds and saying, what do we do now 0? and serendipitously, a friend of my wife's came by the table and she says, i think you'd be very interested to find out that you might find an ally in ted olsen on your issue. >> that's the ted olsen, the conservative legal icon. >> that stunned you, right? >> yes. it more than stunned me. it stunned me, but i said, if this is true, this is the home run of all time. i mean, the idea that ted olsen, this arch conservative, the solicitor general for george bush who had argued bush v gore and basically put me in bed for a couple of days i was so depressed after bush v gore was interested in
that every victim feels the same way. >> do you think he'll admit some of the things he says right now against him if you take this to civil court try to get some money out of it will this help you anything he says from behind bars? >> nothing mr. sandusky says or doesn't say is going to affect the civil lawsuits in my opinion. he, as a convicted felon and in fact mr. paterno's family and mr. paterno back when blamed mr. sandusky. penn state blamed mr. sandusky. everyone believes that he is the root cause of this problem. there's no controversy about that. the only issue remaining is pen state's complicity. penn state's enabling mr. sandusky to do what he did. that's what's on the table in the civil cases. >> so, so one of the, one of the pieces of sound from jerry sandusky in this interview that was aired on nbc where jerry sandusky essentially saying he doesn't understand how somebody could have walked into the shower room, mike mcqueary and, and, and jumped to the conclusions that he did about what was going on in there. i mean he's really attacking the mcqueary witness, and also th
. >> major delays. >> you're right. >> all right, jennifer delgado thanks to you. >>> secretary of state john kerry trying to stop the bloodshed in syria's civil war as he travels in the middle east this morning. yesterday he met with the iraqi president nuri al maliki but apparently he made little headway convincing him to stop allowing the flow of arms and troops into syria. secretary kerry wants tighter scrutiny of overflights in iraq. he's accusing iraq of helping syrian president assad by allowing armed fighters from iran to cross into syria from iraq. >>> authorities in mississippi believe a state lawmaker shot and killed herself over the weekend. 63-year-old jessica upshaw's body was found yesterday in former state representative's home. she served in the mississippi legislature for nearly ten years. she represented the district along the gulf coast. >>> an amazing tale of survival by a 9-year-old girl after a horrifying accident that killed her father. the california highway patrol says she was with him in an suv when it veered off california's remote sierra highway in rolled hundreds
there this morning. where else the storm is hitting right now. bill: a lot of places too. there is growing evidence syria crossed that red line by using chemical weapons. triggering calls for greater u.s. involvement in that country's civil war. >> i look at all the data points over the last two years from these intelligence reports and i believe there is high probability that some level of chemical weapons were used in syria by the assad regime. @e@8ñúñ÷@@@0@ú bill: so a top u.s. law i canner -- lawmaker saying the u.s. government crossed a red line saying it used chemical weapons against opposition forces. now he is urging the u.s. to get more involved in syria's civil war to prevent further bloodshed. >> i think it is abundantly clear that that red line has been crossed. there is mounting evidence that it is probable that the assad regime has used least a small quantity of chemical weapons during this conflict. bill: moo i can religionkers. kt macfarland, fox news security analyst. >> good morning. >> red line, chemical weapons, why is it a week later and there still seems to be a n
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